Religion and Philosophy

Why the Journey is more important than the Destination

Let your joy be in your journey – not in some distant goal. – Tim Cook
wedding couple
The sirens from the flower-decked convoy of wedding revelers blared as the excitement in the air contagiously affected one and all. It was a massively anticipated ceremony. The bride, ever gorgeous – both in gait and poise smiled shyly as she came down from her customized car.
This wasn’t the usual wedding. This was the gathering of the high and mighty – individuals with influence and affluence who will not spare a moment’s notice in showing their perceived worth to the ever growing crowd of enthusiastic well wishers. 
As a proof of his chivalry, the groom athletically alighted from his side of the car, as he sprinted along the little curvature of his jeep to assist his bride in her predicament of having a sure footing. Whistles and gasps rented the atmosphere. “Awwns!” and tears became the highlight of a most lavish ceremony. 
Who wouldn’t want a taste of this ultimate of human free handedness. If this was a spending spree, this particular spree was beyond this planet earth.
The groom, noticing his bride’s shyness leaned over, ever so smartly and ‘lent’ her a kiss or two on her cheek – the bride’s blush becoming evidently brighter than the sun. More “awwns” rented the air as the groom’s otherwise Casanova-tendencies was laid bare to discerning minds.
To the bride, this was a dream that should never end. “Wow, is this me?”, she thought.
Gasping – as she was caught in her deep thoughts.
Something was amiss. Turning to her groom, she noticed his pensiveness. She knew he was a confident, boisterous man – not easily intimidated by someone or something. But this was all too curious. His eyes, searching the horizon like a secret service agent, pensively peering over his shoulders intermittently. No there is something wrong.
“Honey, what is the matter?”
“Nothing my dear, I got this…(mumbling)”
She wasn’t convinced. Being as intelligent as she was, she quickly scanned the scenery only to notice something. This was a convoy – another kind of convoy, anyway. This uneasiness had somehow pilfered through the crowd, as everyone noticed all too well, the rather sudden change in the ever lively groom.
This was a convoy of black cars. They didn’t look like specially invited guests. They looked more like specially aggressive and uninvited guests. 
commando operation
The romance-themed occasion became a grimace-themed one. Watching on like a movie that a train that suddenly got derailed, her spry groom was firmly put in ‘shackles’. He was summarily accused of drug trafficking by his assailants. Without tears, or any form of emotion the bride sat down and thought, “Oh, that explains his wealth!”.
And like an epiphany, she innately surmised: The Journey is more important than the Destination.
 
Sometime ago, a conversation went this way:
 
Person A: Where do see yourself 5 years from now?
 
Person B: I don’t know.
 
Person A: ….
 
This futuristic question has befuddled the most legendary planners and careful decision makers.
 
More curious is the fact that when the question “where?” is asked, the questionnaire always wants specific answers. Always. The questionnaire doesn’t give room for ambiguity.
 
For instance,
 
1) An High-schooler being queried: “where do you see yourself 5 years from now?”. And then answers, “I see myself being a qualified Electrical Engineer”.
 
Unfortunately, that response gets completely doused, when 6 years from now, he is holding his Biochemistry Certificate applying for a job in no-man’s land.
A journey is like marriage. The certain way to be wrong is to think you control it. – John Steinbeck
 
Was it that he was unsure of where he was supposed to be?
 
2) A JOB SEEKER being asked, “Where do you see yourself 5 years from now?”. He answers, “Will love to be this and that..“. All claims based on wishful thinking.
 
Is this a case of giving the wrong answers to the right questions? Or is it simply that the question is not right?
 
From a Philosophical point of view, that question is not correct.
 
The question should be “where are you now?”. The potential of something becomes reprobate when that thing is misunderstood or misrepresented.
 
In clear terms, if you see a piece of wood nearby, you will think it has the potential of actually killing a snake that wants to bite you. Until you discover that termites have done a good job on it.
 
The question of “where” is the question of NOW.
 
Don’t fret over your destination. Be more concerned about the journey, which is ‘implicative’ of your direction.
 
In life, and from the memoirs of great men, the journey is more important than the destination.
 
The only way crime and other vices can be reduced is when people see the journey as more significant than the destination.
 
The phrase -“The end justifies the means” will become anathema, an abomination. Because the ideologies of people will shift from WHAT you became to HOW you became what you became.
 
Therefore people will be more careful of THE MEANS than the end.
 
Relationships will cease to be those romance-themed, futuristic ‘droolings’ of how you will play in the garden with your kids. It will now be of the NOW – the probable struggle, the uneasy feeling of uncertainty. The present. The journey.
 
People break off, depressed, sad, down trodden when their ideas of the future don’t meet their expectations.
 
Shake that off.
 
Your journies mark your memories. And your memories form your perspectives.
 
Spouses die. People lose jobs. Folks get bed-ridden.
 
It is the memories of your journey that keeps you going.
 
WHERE ARE YOU NOW?” should be the question. Or more biblically, “What is in your hand?”.
 
Just make sure you are in the right direction and your destination is sure.
 
The journey is more important than the destination.
There’s no destination. The journey is all that there is, and it can be very, very joyful. Srikumar Rao
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